Epic Battles American Civil War

Epic Battles American Civil War

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Product no.: WGBP-302614001

The American Civil War Rapid Deployment System Paint set is designed for Epic Battles: American Civil War, but equally suitable for miniatures of any scale for that historical period.

$55.00
Product no.: WGBP-311514001

With the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, the tension between the Northern and Southern States boiled over into outright hostility. Birthed in the South, the Confederacy fought to maintain its independence whilst Northern troops headed south in a bid to preserve the union. Four years of hellish fighting ensued, consuming the nation. It was a war the likes of which the Americas had not seen before, and would never again.

It is one of the most studied military conflicts in history, with over 237 named battles in addition to innumerable minor actions and skirmishes. Tactically, battles were still largely linear - regiments frequently fired all their ammunition only to be relieved by the second wave of troops passing through the line. However, the technology of war had become all the more destructive, and casualty rates were atrocious, leading to some historians citing the warfare of the American Civil War to be a precursor to that of the 1st World War over 50 years later.

The Epic Battles system allows gamers to refight these battles on a huge scale. The game is based on the familiar award-winning Black Powder rules system, with a few period-flavour tweaks to cement the battles in the ideologies of American Civil War doctrines.

$170.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414002

The most basic infantry building block was the infantry regiment (referred to as a “battalion” in Hardee’s drill manual, which was used by both sides). In both North and South the infantry regiments were organised on similar lines.

A regiment typically comprised ten companies, each numbering 100 men, supported by staff, drummers and officers. However, the rigours of warfare would summarily lead to a reduction in strength by way of battle, disease and desertion, and a regiment's numbers could vary wildly.

Unlike the North, the general policy of the Confederacy was to send raw recruits to reinforce existing regiments in an effort to keep them at fighting strength. This also bestowed the recruits with the benefit of learning from more experienced fighters.

$30.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414003

The most basic infantry building block was the infantry regiment (referred to as a “battalion” in Hardee’s drill manual, which was used by both sides). In both North and South the infantry regiments were organised on similar lines.

A regiment typically comprised ten companies, each numbering 100 men, supported by staff, drummers and officers. However, the rigours of warfare would summarily lead to a reduction in strength by way of battle, disease and desertion, and a regiment's numbers could vary wildly.

The states of the north had a tendency to allow regiments to fall below an effective level, to a point where a number of such regiments would be forged into a brand-new formation. This sometimes had a detrimental effect as units lost their identities and their associated fighting spirit.

The most common identifier for a regiment was a number and the State in which they were raised – for example, the “15th Alabama” or the “4th Connecticut”.

$30.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414004

Cavalry played a pivotal role in all conflicts up to and including the American Civil War, however, it is fair to say that the use of cavalry was forever changed during the War.

Predominantly armed with Pistol, Sabre or Carbine, Cavalry was employed in its traditional role during the beginning of the conflict, but quickly evolved into (under pressure from increasingly accurate rifle fire) a delaying, harassment and long-distance raiding force.

Whilst the application of cavalry as an effective tool for contributing to overall strategic success had changed, the tool was still considered very effective at instilling terror and trepidation into the hearts of the enemy, who were all too aware at what could be over the next hill.

$60.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414005

The Zouave Regiments (or Zouave Inspired Regiments) were used by both the Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

The formations from New York and Pennsylvania became arguably the most popular and colourful additions to the Civil War, and present Epic Battles ACW players with fantastically interesting additions to their tabletop forces.

$60.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414006

The Iron Brigade (or black hats) was an infantry brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac, formed of regiments of three now Midwest states. Known for their strong fighting prowess and distinctive uniform, the Iron Brigade suffered the highest casualties of any formation during the Civil War.

$60.00
Product no.: WGBP-312414007

The role of Cavalry during the American Civil War went through a peculiar evolution. The realities of the evolving battlefield required a change from the tactics of previous wars. A headlong charge into formed enemy infantry or artillery became an unnecessary risk, the firepower they wielded more than enough to prevent any such charge from hitting home. Cavalry thus fought differently in the civil war than previous conflicts, though their role was no less pivotal. Headlong cavalry charges were largely replaced by cavalrymen acting more as dragoons - mounted infantry.

Cavalry combined two useful military attributes: mobility and firepower. Though perhaps outranged by an infantry regiment with rifles the cavalry could still dismount to hold ground temporarily until relieved by the infantry. Armed with a carbine a trooper could dismount and fight perhaps as effectively as his infantry counterpart. In this role the cavalry would invariably dismount into a skirmish screen, with nominally a quarter of the troopers detailed as horse holders, though some commanders preferred to think of the “fourth man” forming a reserve to be called upon if the line was hard pressed. Commonly a regiment in a brigade might be held in reserve, mounted, whilst the remainder of the brigade fought on foot. Such tactics sat well with the cavalry who saw the mounted charge as risky and perhaps even futile.

$60.00
Product no.: WGBP-315114012

Skirmishing troops were important parts of Union and Confederate battleplans during the American Civil War. Ranging ahead of the main attack columns, skirmishers advanced in loose formations to harass the enemy, draw fire, and 'screen' the troops behind them ahead of a major bayonet charge.

Skirmishers deployed ahead of the main battle line to do damage by shooting and unsettle the enemy line prior to the assault. These detached soldiers would move ahead of the main body in extended order with gaps of perhaps five yards between men, making best use of the cover available, even trying to work in pairs, ideally using a fire and movement system as they advanced. Their aim was to draw the enemy’s fire and to do damage, making the enemy unsettled enough for a bayonet charge from the main body.

Skirmishers were not always used, however. Once deployed, they tended to become uncontrollable as each man sought to take shelter away from his officers. Rates of fire slackened as each man might try to take more careful aim with what was, actually, an inherently inaccurate weapon. They would also not be used where the aim of the battle plan was to inflict as much damage as possible by mass of firepower.

The models in this boxed set are suitable to represent Skirmishers for both Union and Confederate armies. They can equally be used to represent famous regiments such as Berdan's Sharpshooters on the Union side to the Rebel Whitworth Sharpshooters.

$40.00
Product no.: WGBP-315114015

Robert E. Lee: The son of ‘Light Horse Harry’ Lee, an officer who served in a previous rebellion, Robert Edward Lee graduated top in his class at West Point at the start of his military career. He was an accomplished officer and had served across the country and provided staunch service during the Mexican War. When Virginia seceded Lee felt bound to his native state and resigned his commission in the Regular Army, offering his services to Virginia and the fledgling Confederacy. Famously, Lee was offered command of the Union forces about to head south, but felt honour bound and declined.

During the next four years he proved to be one of the greatest battlefield commanders and tacticians of his age. He invaded the North late in ’62 and held McClellan again at Sharpsburg (Antietam). On the strategic defensive in early ’63 he defeated The Army of the Potomac at Chancellorsville in May where Jackson fell. On the offensive in June he led his army into Pennsylvania and the climactic battle of Gettysburg where he was checked by Meade.

On the defensive, Lee was initially able to match and hold Grant as he bore down on the Confederacy in ’64 and ’65, but eventually no amount of tactical genius could offset the numerical and technical superiority of the Union. With his lines around Petersburg breeched Lee abandoned the city and Richmond and struck out west trying to avoid the circling Union armies. Eventually Lee was compelled to surrender himself and his army to Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9th, 1865

Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson: Jackson is one of most able Confederate commanders and is only eclipsed, perhaps, by Lee. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson was an instructor at the Virginia Military Institute when war broke out and offered his services to his native state, Virginia. At First Manassas he won immortality when his brigade held its ground in the face of a heavy Union assault. A fellow officer, noting Jackson’s brigade and trying to rally his own men, called out: “Look, there stands Jackson – like a stone wall!” The name stuck.

Jackson was placed in command of the Confederate forces operating in the Shenandoah Valley and promptly lead his Union opponents a merry chase. By a series of forced marches with his infantry, or “foot cavalry” as they became known due to their speed, he was able to surprise and defeat all the Union forces sent against him in isolation. His antics were largely aided by the fact that he had a much better map of the Valley than his opponents – reputedly 10 ft long! At Antietam his corps held all of McClellan’s uncoordinated assaults despite heavy losses and at Fredericksburg his troops performed the same duty. In May of 1863 he and Lee masterminded a flank assault that broke Hooker’s will and drove the Army of the Potomac north. It was at the moment of his greatest success that he was accidentally shot by his own men on the evening of the 2nd May while reconnoitering the Union lines ready for a renewal of the action. Carried from the field, his left arm was amputated but complications ensued and he died on the 10th May 1863.

Also included is a HQ standard Bearer.

This pack contains 3 mounted command figures in metal.

Note that this figure has a brand-new pose and differs from the ACW pre-order exclusive figure.

$10.00
Product no.: WGBP-315114016

Ulysses S. Grant: Ulysses Simpson Grant, or more accurately Hiram Ulysses Grant (he was registered incorrectly at West Point) was a total failure. He failed in several business ventures; when president his administration was rocked by scandals; he lost most of his wealth after the war in further failed ventures and only gained back some funds by publishing his memoirs. Grant – the failure. However, there was one enterprise at which Grant excelled – War!

Grant had served in the Mexican War but then left the army to pursue a career in business. When war came in 1861 he promptly rejoined offering his services to the cause of Union. Initially serving as a brigade commander in 1862 he was promoted to major general and secured Kentucky and most of Tennessee for the Union. At Shiloh in 1862 he was surprised by Johnston’s Confederates but, completely unfazed by the initial setbacks, launched a counter-attack and won the battle. In July 1863 Grant outmanoeuvred and defeated the Confederate forces defending Vicksburg and captured the city in July, in effect splitting the Confederacy, the navy already having secured passage of the Mississippi river. Grant was not present at Chickamauga, but was in command at the victory of Chattanooga/Missionary Ridge. In light of his successes Grant was promoted to Lieutenant General and commander of all of the Union armies. Grant then came East to oversee the campaign against Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia. Although Meade remained in command of the Army of the Potomac Grant went along with it, effectively using Meade’s own headquarters and staff as a post office for issuing his own orders. The battles against Lee in 1864 have gone down in history as some of the most savage of the war. Grant was often held by Lee but, again unfazed, he refused to acknowledge defeat and simply shifted his entire army “to the left”, forcing Lee to follow him to the next bloody encounter. Eventually Grant trapped Lee in a siege at Petersburg, a campaign of attrition then ensued.

Whilst sat outside Petersburg Grant oversaw other operations against the Confederacy, most notably those conducted by Sherman and Sheridan. In April ’65 Grant finally broke through Lee’s defences, captured Petersburg and then Richmond – the long sought after prize of the past four years. 68 June 26th 1862 – The Battle of Mechanicsville, Virginia Lee was finally cornered at Appomattox and compelled to surrender what remained of his army to a generous Grant. Denounced by many as a “butcher” for his losses during the battles against Lee Grant is still undoubtedly one of the great commanders of the age.

George Meade: George Gordon Meade is best known for his defeat of Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg. With a military background honed by experience in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War, Meade served as a Union General in the American Civil War. From initially commanding a brigade in the Peninsula Campaign and the Seven Days Battles, to meeting great success as a division commander, particularly at the Battle of Fredericksburg, he eventually rose to command the Army of the Potomac.

This command came only three days before the crucial Battle of Gettysburg, and he only arrived in the field after the first day of action on July 1. The Army of the Potomac used favourable ground and positioning to repel a series of large-scale assaults over the next two days. Robert E. Lee's Army of North Virginia, unable to overcome these defences was forced to retreat, ending his hope of invading the North. Though hailed as a great victory, it was undermined by the perceived ineffectiveness of Meade's pursuit of the retreat, which prevented Lee's total destruction. In the latter years of the war his influence was overshadowed by that of general-in-chief, Ulysses S. Grant, who accompanied him through the Overland Campaign, the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign and the Appomattox Campaign.

Note that this figure has a brand-new pose and differs from the ACW pre-order exclusive figure.

Also included is a HQ standard Bearer.

$10.00
Product no.: WGBP-318814001

‘Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.’

Excerpt from the Gettysburg Address – Abraham Lincoln, November 19, 1863

Between July 1st and 3rd 1863, the Battle of Gettysburg was one of the largest battles of the American Civil War fought in the state of Pennsylvania. The Confederate Army under Robert E Lee was defeated by the Army of the Potomac, commanded by George G. Meade. Though Lee’s forces escaped across the river, they left in their wake the bodies of the fallen. These bodies were gradually reinterred into what is now the Gettysburg National Cemetery, the site where Lincoln delivered the famous Gettysburg Address of 1863.

This scenery pack is designed to allow you to lend your replications of the battle using the Epic Battles system extra authenticity. It includes the Schmucker House, originally constructed as the Theological Seminary building. This site was used by both the Union and Confederate forces as a hospital during the battle.

The Cemetery Gatehouse meanwhile was used as a HQ for XI Corps (Union Army). Major-General Howard had recognized the advantage offered by the high ground of the cemetery and lined his artillery along what came to be known as ‘Cemetery Hill’.

$55.00
Product no.: WGBP-318814002

This pack is designed to lend your Epic Battles: American Civil War campaigns with a little extra tabletop authenticity. Included are two houses typical of the period as well as a Dutch Style Barn, largely located in the American Midwest – less than 600 examples are estimated to still be standing today.

It was amidst this architecture that the North and South clashed ferociously, and many buildings of this nature suffered destruction as a result of such warfare.

$25.00